“Jasmine Revolution”
Symbol of peace: Flowers placed on the barrel of a tank
in very much calmer protests than in recent days in Tunisia

'The Protester' - Time Person of the Year 2011

'The Protester' - Time Person of the Year 2011
Mannoubia Bouazizi, the mother of Tunisian street vendor Mohammed Bouazizi. "Mohammed suffered a lot. He worked hard. but when he set fire to himself, it wasn’t about his scales being confiscated. It was about his dignity." (Peter Hapak for TIME)

How eyepatches became a symbol of Egypt's revolution - Graffiti depicting a high ranking army officer with an eye patch Photograph: Nasser Nasser/ASSOCIATED PRESS

2 - EGYPT Democratic Change / Freedom of Speech (In Transition)


''17 February Revolution"

3 - LIBYA Democratic Change / Freedom of Speech (In Transition)

5 - SYRIA Democratic Change / Freedom of Speech (In Transition)

"25 January Youth Revolution"
Muslim and Christian shoulder-to-shoulder in Tahrir Square
"A Summary" – Apr 2, 2011 (Kryon channelled by Lee Carroll) (Subjects: Religion, Shift of Human Consciousness, 2012, Intelligent/Benevolent Design, EU, South America, 5 Currencies, Water Cycle (Heat up, Mini Ice Ace, Oceans, Fish, Earthquakes ..), Middle East, Internet, Israel, Dictators, Palestine, US, Japan (Quake/Tsunami Disasters , People, Society ...), Nuclear Power Revealed, Hydro Power, Geothermal Power, Moon, Financial Institutes (Recession, Realign integrity values ..) , China, North Korea, Global Unity,..... etc.) -
(Subjects: Egypt Uprising, Iran/Persia Uprising, Peace in Middle East without Israel actively involved, Muhammad, "Conceptual" Youth Revolution, "Conceptual" (without a manager hierarchy) managed Businesses, Internet, Social Media, News Media, Google, Bankers, Global Unity,..... etc.)
"The End of History" – Nov 20, 2010 (Kryon channelled by Lee Carroll)
(Subjects:Abraham, Isaac, Ishmael, Muhammad, Jesus, God, Jews, Arabs, EU, US, Israel, Iran, Russia, Africa, South America, Global Unity,..... etc.) (Text version)

"If an Arab and a Jew can look at one another and see the Akashic lineage and see the one family, there is hope. If they can see that their differences no longer require that they kill one another, then there is a beginning of a change in history. And that's what is happening now. All of humanity, no matter what the spiritual belief, has been guilty of falling into the historic trap of separating instead of unifying. Now it's starting to change. There's a shift happening."


“ … Here is another one. A change in what Human nature will allow for government. "Careful, Kryon, don't talk about politics. You'll get in trouble." I won't get in trouble. I'm going to tell you to watch for leadership that cares about you. "You mean politics is going to change?" It already has. It's beginning. Watch for it. You're going to see a total phase-out of old energy dictatorships eventually. The potential is that you're going to see that before 2013.

They're going to fall over, you know, because the energy of the population will not sustain an old energy leader ..."



Heads of governments during the opening session of the African Union summit
on January 30, 2014 at the AU headquarters in Addis Ababa (AFP, Samuel Gebru)

Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela
Few words can describe Nelson Mandela, so we let him speak for himself. Happy birthday, Madiba.
Loading...

Monday, January 7, 2013

African civil servants, please retire!

RNW, Mohamadou Houmfa, Yaoundé, 7 January 2013

RNW Africa Desk (AFP)

Government officials in many African countries simply refuse to retire. In office for three, four and sometimes five decades, aged civil servants continue to hang on to their positions.

In many African countries, government officials and political leaders do not want to hear about retirement, although legally they are usually expected to retire at 55 or 60. These government officials use various schemes to remain in office. Some obtain special extensions by presidential decree, while others often fraudulently lower their age to become 'officially' younger.

Clinging to positions

Why do they cling so desperately to their positions at the expenses of the unemployed youth?

“When I retire, I will receive one third of my current salary,” explains Théophile, a civil servant in Cameroon. “What can I do with it?”, he wonders. “We have very low salaries, and we have to look after our families and help our relatives. We can’t really afford to save. One can start his career in government with a salary of 150,000 CFA francs (€230) and end with 250,000 CFA francs (€380). Without the benefits, one cannot afford to build a house and secure a decent life after retirement.”

Bad management

Kouotou, a young entrepreneur, highlights how civil servants manage their income. “Most of them live from hand to mouth", he says. "They do not make any plans to save for a peaceful retirement. Therefore, a number of them are surprised when it comes time to retire, and they choose to hang on to their positions.”

Kouotou’s observations are shared by a majority of young Cameroonians. “When I was still in primary school, the current president, the prime minister and most ministers were already in office", says Florent, frustrated and unemployed. "Meanwhile, I have completed my Master’s degree and they are still there. There is no turnover. Everyone wants to remain in office until they die. How are we then going to find jobs?”

But for Simondi Barlev Bidjocka, leader of the Cameroonian Youth Rally (RJC), another reason government officials cling to their positions is because being a civil servant essentially means pay without work. "One comes to work at 10 a.m. and leaves at 3 p.m.”, he says.

No turnover

What adds to the frustration of some young people is the fact that senior government officials were still very young when they accessed executive positions. “The youth need to be given a chance. Young people are the future of the country and the continent. If the elders continue to hang on to office, the youth will ultimately rebel. Everywhere around the world, young people are the ones leading popular uprisings. So they must listen to us,” warns an angry Florent.

The RJC is launching a campaign to call for more young people in executive positions.



Related Article:


No comments:

Post a Comment